List of Syriac New Testament Manuscripts

The Syriac Version of the New Testament is one of the earliest and most important versions. Over 350 Syriac manuscripts of the New Testament have survived into the present. What kind of information might you find? A description or history of the manuscript. You might also find textual information like; it lacks the Pericope Adulterae (John 7:53-8:11). You might discover if it has any lacunae, how it was dated, and the different hands of the copyists. And many other pieces of information. Some have more information than others.

Syriac Versions of the Bible

The Old Testament.—There are two Syriac translations of this part of the Bible, one made directly from the original language Hebrew, and the other from an ancient Greek version. The Syriac New-Testament Versions.—These we may conveniently enumerate under five heads, including several recensions under some of them, but treating separately the notable “Curetonian text.”

Bible Translation Into Coptic

There have been many Coptic versions of the Bible, including some of the earliest translations into any language. Several different versions were made in the ancient world, with different editions of the Old and New Testament in five of the dialects of Coptic.

THE ARAMAIC VERSION

Bible Translations into Aramaic covers both Jewish translations into Aramaic (Targum) and Christian translations into Aramaic, also called Syriac (Peshitta). Some prominent Aramaic manuscripts would be The Yonan Codex, The Khabouris Codex, The 1199 Houghton Codex, and The Mingana 148 Codex.

The Greek Septuagint and Other Versions

There are currently over 2000 classified manuscripts of the Septuagint. The Grek Septuagint is the oldest Greek version of the Old Testament; said to have been translated from the Hebrew by Jewish scholars at the request of Ptolemy II, but more likely at the request of Alexandrian Jews. The full translation was from 280 B.C.E. to 150 B.C.E.

What Do We Know About the Ancient Armenian Version of the Bible?

The Armenian Version of the Bible designated by (arm) dates from the early fifth century C.E., which includes all of the New Testament and was likely, prepared from both Greek and Syriac texts. It is often called the “queen of the versions” and many regards it as both beautiful and accurate. The New Testament is a very literal translation, which, of course, is quite helpful to textual criticism.

Who Were the Goths and Why Is the Gothic Version of Interest to Textual Scholars and Bible Translators?

The Goths were a group of loosely allied Germanic tribes, most likely beginning in Scandinavia. In the first few centuries after Jesus Christ's life and death, they migrated as far south as the Black Sea and the Danube River, to the very outposts of the Roman Empire. The Gothic Bible was the first literary work in any Germanic tongue. Ulfilas (c. 311–383 C.E.) - Bruce Metzger

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