The Revelation of John

The Book of Revelation is the final book of the New Testament, and consequently is also the final book of the Christian Bible. Its title is derived from the first word of the Koine Greek text: apokalypsis, meaning "unveiling" or "revelation." John authored this book on the island of Patmos about 96 C.E.

The Epistle of Jude

The Epistle of Jude, often shortened to Jude, is the second to the last book of the New Testament and the Bible as a whole and is authored by Jude, the servant of Jesus and the brother of James the Just. It was written in Palestine (?) about 65 C.E.

The Third Epistle of John

The Third Epistle of John, often referred to as Third John and written 3 John or III John, is the third-to-last book of the New Testament and the Christian Bible as a whole, and attributed to John the Evangelist, the apostle John being the author of the Gospel of John and the other two epistles of John. This epistle was written in Ephesus about 98 C.E.

The Second Epistle of John

The Second Epistle of John, often referred to as Second John and often written 2 John or II John, is a book of the New Testament attributed to John the Evangelist, the apostle John being the author of the other two epistles of John, and the Gospel of John. This was written in Ephesus about 98 C.E.

The First Epistle of John

This epistle was written in Ephesus about 98 C.E. John advises Christians on how to discern true teachers: by their ethics, their proclamation of Jesus in the flesh, and by their love. The epistle is divided into five chapters.

The Second Epistle of Peter

According to the Epistle itself and external sources, it was composed by the Apostle Peter in Babylon about 64 C.E. Peter was an eyewitness to Jesus' ministry. ... 2 Peter explains that God is patient, and has not yet brought the Second Coming of Christ in order that more people will have the chance to reject evil and find salvation (3:3–9).

The First Epistle of Peter

The First Epistle of Peter is addressed to "the strangers scattered abroad", i.e., to the Jews of the Dispersion (the Diaspora). Its object is to confirm its readers in the doctrines they had been already taught. Peter has been called "the apostle of hope," because this epistle abounds with words of comfort and encouragement fitted to sustain a "lively hope." It contains about thirty-five references to the Old Testament. It was written from Babylon about 62–64 C.E., on the Euphrates, which was at this time one of the chief seats of Jewish learning, and a fitting centre for labour among the Jews.

The Epistle of James

The Epistle of James, the Letter of James, or simply James, is one of the 21 epistles in the New Testament. The author identifies himself as "James, a servant [or slave] of God and of the Lord Jesus Christ" who is writing to "the twelve tribes scattered abroad." Jesus’ Half Brother James wrote in Jerusalem sometime before 62 C.E.

The Epistle of Paul to the Hebrews

The Epistle to the Hebrews, or Letter to the Hebrews, or in the Greek manuscripts, simply To the Hebrews (Πρὸς Ἑβραίους) is one of the books of the New Testament. The text does not mention the name of its author, but was written by the apostle Paul about 61 C.E. in Rome.

The Epistle of Paul to Philemon

Paul the Apostle to Philemon, abbreviation Philemon, brief New Testament letter written by St. Paul the Apostle to a wealthy Christian of Colossae, in the ancient Roman province of Asia (now in western Turkey), on behalf of Onesimus, who was enslaved to Philemon and may have run away from him. It was written about 60–61 C.E. in Rome.

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