The Book of Job

The story of Job is one of the best known in the entire Bible yet, strangely enough, one of the least understood. No book in the Scripture is so shrouded in mystery as this ancient story. As Winston Churchill once described the Soviet Union, Job is “a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma.” Tangled and troubling, its pages are veiled with the deep, perplexing issues of life. Profoundly provocative to the human mind, Job is a journey into the inscrutable ways of God.—Max Anders and Steven Lawson

The Second Book of The Chronicles

The Book of Chronicles is a Hebrew prose work, constituting part of Jewish and Christian scripture. These books were designed to sustain the hopes and prayers of God's people as they wait for God to fulfill his ancient promises. "Chronicles was a book of hope for its time. We will call the message of 1 and 2 Chronicles the 'gospel according to Ezra.'" - Winfried Corduan; Max Anders.

The First Book of The Chronicles

The Book of Chronicles is a Hebrew prose work constituting part of Jewish and Christian scripture. It contains a genealogy starting from Adam and a narrative of the history of ancient Judah and Israel until the proclamation of King Cyrus the Great (c. 537 BC). The time frame covered in 1 Chronicles mirrors parts of 2 Samuel and 1 Kings. The chronicler, Ezra, focused on David's reign in 1 Chronicles

The Second Book of The Kings

"The two books of Kings were written originally as one book. Even though they describe events long ago and far away, they bring a message that is surprisingly current and relevant." - Max Anders

The Book of Nehemiah

"Nehemiah is a great example of someone whose desire was to please God and glorify him. His intentions and aspirations were God-focused rather than self-focused. God defined his dominant purpose. When he heard that the walls of Jerusalem were broken down and God's people were living in distress, that driving purpose kicked in. Nehemiah prayed a profound prayer of praise, adoration, submission, and request." - Max Anders; Knute Larson; Kathy Dahlen

The Book of Ezra

"We are taken from ground level, with its distortions and limited vision, and given a view from above. At this clarifying distance, we see that life on earth is not directed by the whim of rulers or the might of armies, but by the determination of God. Viewpoint makes all the difference in the world. God's all-encompassing sovereignty and humanity's capacity for choice exist together. God—absolute and unrivalled in his actions and authority; man—free and responsible." - Max Anders, Knute Larson, Kathy Dahlen.

The Lamentations

The material known as the Book of Lamentations consists of five chapters containing material related to the fall of Jerusalem. Each chapter seems to be an independent poem. The author of these five literary and spiritual masterpieces wrote against the background of the greatest tragedy Jerusalem's inhabitants had ever experienced. The mighty city lay in ruins, having been ravished by Babylon's mighty war machine. Bible scholars are in virtual unanimity that Nebuchadnezzar's recent invasions of 597 and 586 B.C. served as the occasion for the destruction." - Max Anders; Fred M. Wood; Ross H. McLaren

The Song of Solomon

"Although often called the Song of Solomon, the Hebrew title for the book is “Song of Songs.” This is how the Hebrew language says “The Best Song.” The book portrays the deep, genuine love between a man and a woman in marriage. The subject of the book is quite obviously sexual in nature. The intimacy and physical pleasure God intended for a man and a woman is tastefully and appealingly put on full display before us (cf. Gen. 2:15-25)." - David Moore; Dr. Daniel L. Akin

Book of Ecclesiastes

"There is no doubt that the book contains a good deal of sobering truths about life, but they are mentioned to contrast with other truths that demonstrate what life can be like when God intervenes. This is not a life devoid of pain, suffering, and confusion over what God is doing (Wright, “The Riddle of the Sphinx,” 334). Indeed, Ecclesiastes is quite clear in stating that we can't fully know the mind of God (Whybray, Ecclesiastes, 29-30). Statements about the limitations of human understanding are common (see Eccl. 1:18; 3:11). The writer is prodding us to realize that no matter how exciting our life may be, it is ultimately meaningless apart from God." - David Moore; Dr. Daniel L. Akin

The Book of Zechariah

"God does not always act in such an unusual manner, but he is always concerned for the welfare of his children. This is the message of the first two chapters of the Book of Zechariah. In these chapters God expresses his concern for the helpless and oppressed people of ancient Judah. Zechariah begins with a call to repentance (which the people heed) and follows with three fascinating visions, each conveying in some manner God's care for his people. Zechariah's message of God's care was written not only for the Jews of twenty-five hundred years ago but for believers today." - Stephen Miller

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