EZEKIEL 33:7: God’s Message to Ezekiel, His Watchman: A Call to Repentance and Faithfulness

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THE CREATION DAYS OF GENESIS gift of prophecy

In Ezekiel 33:7, Jehovah speaks to the prophet Ezekiel, giving him the role of a watchman for the Israelites. Jehovah says, “So you, son of man, I have made a watchman for the house of Israel. Whenever you hear a word from my mouth, you shall give them warning from me.”

This verse is significant because it shows that the Israelites are being held accountable for their actions and that they will be held responsible for any sins they commit. The watchman is responsible for warning the people of the consequences of their actions and calling them to repentance. This passage serves as a reminder that all individuals are accountable for their actions and will be judged accordingly.

In a broader sense, it also shows the importance of being attentive and keeping watch for any spiritual danger, that one should always be ready to give a warning and call others to repentance and faithfulness.

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Throughout the Bible, we see instances in which God warned the people of impending judgment and called them to repentance before carrying out His punishment. For example, in the story of Noah, God warned of the coming flood and gave Noah time to build an ark and save his family. Similarly, in the story of Sodom and Gomorrah, God sent angels to warn Lot and his family to leave the city before it was destroyed. Additionally, in the book of Ezekiel, God used the prophet to warn the Israelites of the consequences of their sins and call them to repentance. This idea that God is always giving warning before striking is in line with the belief that God is just and loving, giving people the opportunity to change their ways before dispensing punishment.

Jehovah God, as the creator of the universe, is not able to physically come to earth without destroying it and us with it, as a human being couldn’t survive a visit from Him. So God uses messengers, either in the form of prophets or angels, to deliver His messages to people. In the Bible, we see many examples of God sending prophets to warn the Israelites and other nations of impending judgment and call them to repentance. In the book of Jeremiah, specifically, we see God sending Jeremiah to warn the Israelites of the consequences of their sins and to call them to repentance. Even though God warned them early and late through His messengers, the Israelites failed to listen and would not heed the warnings. The passage from Jeremiah 7:13, 25, 28 highlights this idea that God’s warnings were ignored by the Israelites.

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In the story of the flood in the Book of Genesis, we see that the wickedness of mankind had become great and that the earth was corrupt. God determined to cleanse the earth of this wickedness by means of a flood that lasted for forty days and forty nights, and the floodwaters did not dry up for many months afterward.

Before the flood, God warned Noah of the coming judgment and gave him instructions to build an ark to save himself and his family. Even though the people around him were corrupt and wicked, he was obedient and listened to the warning of God.

It’s important to note that the passage from Genesis also shows that God’s decision to flood the earth was not arbitrary or capricious, it is an act of justice and righteousness in response to the people’s wickedness, and despite the fact that the majority of people did not heed the warning, God provided a way of salvation for those who did listen and acted upon it.

According to the Bible, God warned Noah of the impending flood and gave him 120 years to build the ark and prepare for the flood. Over this time, Noah preached righteousness and warned others of the coming judgment, but the majority of people did not believe him and scoffed at the possibility of a worldwide flood. Despite this, God kept His word and brought the flood as He had warned, destroying all life on the earth except for those in the ark.

This story of the flood serves as an example of the importance of listening to God’s warnings and heeding His call to repentance, even when the majority of people do not believe. It also highlights the idea that God is just and righteous and that He will carry out His judgment on the wickedness of mankind.

The story of Sodom and Gomorrah in the Bible is an example of God’s judgment on wickedness and sin. According to the story, the cities of Sodom and Gomorrah were so wicked that there were not even ten righteous people living there. When angels came to the city in the form of men and stayed with Lot, the people of the city attempted to harm the angels. Despite this, they did not recognize their wickedness even when they were struck blind.

When the angels warned Lot of the impending destruction of the cities, his message was not taken seriously, and he was viewed as a jester. Lot’s own family was divided, with his wife not taking the warning seriously enough to be saved. In the end, only Lot and his two daughters were able to escape before God destroyed the cities with fire and brimstone from heaven, wiping out all the inhabitants and everything that grew on the ground.

This story serves as a warning of the dangers of persistent and unchecked wickedness and disobedience to God and the importance of listening to the warnings and heeding God’s call to repentance.—Gen. 18:20, 32; 19:4-28.

In the book of Exodus, we see God warning Pharaoh through Moses of the impending plagues that would come upon Egypt if he did not let the Israelites go. Before each plague, Moses warned Pharaoh of what was to come, but despite this, Pharaoh’s heart hardened, and he refused to let the Israelites go. The plagues that God sent upon Egypt through Moses included turning the Nile River to blood, frogs, lice, flies, disease among the livestock, boils, hail, locusts, three days of darkness, and the death of the firstborn.

The plagues were a powerful demonstration of God’s authority and sovereignty, and it was clear to the Egyptians that these were not natural events but rather were caused by God as a punishment for Pharaoh’s refusal to let the Israelites go. The pagan religious leaders of Egypt tried to counteract and misinterpret the plagues, but they were unsuccessful in the end. The Israelites had contact with the Egyptians, and many of them came to believe in God and joined them when they finally left Egypt and witnessed the destruction of Pharaoh’s army in the Red Sea.—Ex. 12:38; 7:1-14:31.

ISRAEL AND JUDAH WARNED OF THEIR FALLS

Throughout the history of ancient Israel, the nation received many warnings from God through His prophets. After the Israelites entered Canaan and established the kingdoms of Israel and Judah, the northern kingdom of Israel, with its capital at Samaria, received repeated warnings of impending captivity through the prophets Isaiah, Micah, and Amos. They warned of the consequences of the people’s sins and called them to repentance, but the warnings were largely ignored.

The prophet Hosea, in particular, delivered a powerful warning against the northern kingdom of Israel. He rebuked the nation for their sins, including the pollution of the land with blood, robbery, and violence, as well as rampant idolatry and spiritual unfaithfulness. Hosea spoke of the impending judgment that the nation would face if they did not repent and turn back to God and warned them that if they continued in their ways, they would be carried into captivity.

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The northern kingdom of Israel was eventually conquered and carried into captivity by the Assyrians in 740 B.C. The warnings of the prophets, such as Hosea, were fulfilled, as the nation had ignored the warnings and continued in their sins despite the repeated calls to repentance.—Hos. 6:8-11; 7:1-11; 8:7-9; 11:5; 13:16.

The kingdom of Judah, which was centered at Jerusalem, was eventually conquered and carried into captivity by the Babylonians in 587 B.C., despite receiving repeated warnings from God through His prophets.

Several prophets, such as Micah, Hosea, and Isaiah, gave warnings of the coming disaster some 150 years before the fall of Jerusalem. And in the forty years prior to the desolation, Jeremiah warned the people of the impending judgment and the length of desolation, despite facing abuse, mockery, beating, and imprisonment for his message. He repeatedly called the people to repentance and faithfulness and warned them of the consequences of their disobedience and sins.

Despite these warnings, the people of Judah did not listen, and Jerusalem and its Temple were destroyed, and the people were carried into captivity by the Babylonians for 70 years, just as the prophet Jeremiah had foretold. This is a vivid example of how a warning from God was given and how it was ignored, with catastrophic results.—Jer. 25:8, 9, 11.

The city of Jerusalem and its inhabitants were warned by the prophets of impending judgment due to their abandonment of Jehovah’s worship and their participation in idolatry, child sacrifice, and other forms of wickedness. The prophets were often viewed as “calamity-howlers,” “social misfits,” “fanatics,” “malcontents,” and as being against everything and everybody. Despite these warnings, the people of Jerusalem mocked the prophets and refused to believe that God would bring judgment upon them. They argued that God will neither do good nor evil and that He has abandoned the earth. They believed that the visions of the prophets were for far-off times that would never come to pass.—Zeph. 1:12; Ezek. 8:12; 12:22, 27.

But God Himself refutes these claims, affirming that the days of judgment are at hand and that every vision of the prophets shall be fulfilled. He makes clear that He will speak a word, and it shall be fulfilled and no longer delayed, and that this will happen in the people’s days as proof that He exists and that He is in control. The story of Jerusalem serves as an example of the consequences of not listening to the warnings of God and refusing to repent, despite the fact that the city bore God’s name.—Ezek. 12:23-25, 28.

The so-called “smart people” were wrong, and the prophets of God were right. The warnings of impending judgment and doom were not for a distant future but for their own time, and the visions of the prophets were meant to serve as a warning to the people of the city. The prophet Ezekiel, for example, was specifically designated as a watchman to sound the warning to the house of Israel and to warn them of the impending doom if they did not repent and turn back to God.

Similarly, the prophet Habakkuk was told by God that the judgment would come not in distant days but upon those hearing the warning witness. He was shown that God would use the Chaldeans, a bitter and ruthless nation, to conquer the land and gather the people into captivity. This again serves as an example of how warnings from God were given but not heeded by the people and how it led to the destruction of the city.—Hab. 1:5-9.

Jehovah God foretold not only the rise of Babylon against Judah but also its fall. Despite this, Babylon failed to take note of the prediction of her fall and instead showed special consideration to Jeremiah because of the prophecies in his favor. Jehovah God had revealed through the prophet Jeremiah that after 70 years, He would punish the king of Babylon and the nation for their iniquity and make the land of the Chaldeans a perpetual desolation. This warning went unheeded by Babylon, as well as the words of the prophet Habakkuk that retributive justice would return upon Babylon’s head.—Jer. 25:12.

Furthermore, the prophet Isaiah gave a detailed prophecy of Babylon’s collapse some 200 years in advance. He taunts the powerful city about her fall and predicts that the conquerors will be the Medes and Persians and that the chief militarist will be Cyrus. He also states that before this, the city’s two-leaved gates would be found carelessly left open. These predictions were fulfilled when in 539 B.C. Cyrus and his army entered the city through the open gates and conquered it, as foretold by Isaiah and as the handwriting on the wall predicted in the last minutes of Babylon’s glory.—Isa. 21:2, 9; 45:1-4; chaps. 13, 14, 47; Dan. 5:25-31.

The mighty Assyrian Empire should not have been shocked when it came to their turn to experience the same fate they had inflicted upon Israel when they were defeated by Nebuchadnezzar in 625 B.C. Jehovah’s prophets Micah, Isaiah, and Zephaniah had mentioned the fall of Assyria in their prophecy, and Nahum bore a detailed witness of it, describing the downfall in vivid detail.

Nahum’s prophecy specifically focused on the destruction of the Assyrian capital of Nineveh, which was the capital of Assyria at the time. The defeat of Assyria by Babylon served as an example of how even powerful nations can fall when they refuse to listen to the warnings of God and continue in their ways of violence and oppression.—Mic. 5:6; Isa. 10:12-16; Zeph. 2:13-15; Nahum chaps. 1-3.

THE WARNING IN JESUS’ DAY

After the restoration of true worship at the rebuilt temple in Jerusalem following the release from captivity, formalistic ceremony and rabbinic traditions grew in importance over time until by the time of Christ Jesus, true worship had been largely obscured and replaced by these practices. This called for another warning and another witness for true worship.

Christ Jesus, when he appeared, responded to this need with a campaign of warning and witnessing that sought to correct the errors of the past. He called for repentance and a return to true worship, emphasizing the importance of faith, love, and obedience to God. His message was one of the Kingdom of Heaven being at hand, and the focus was on the facts and prophecies that identified him as the Messiah. He actively challenged the religious traditions that were obscuring the truth and leading many to destruction. He wants to free people of the quagmires of religious traditions to come back to the worship of God as described in the scripture.

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Jesus sought to reach as many people as possible with his message of repentance and the coming of the Kingdom of Heaven. He traveled from house to house and preached in the streets, in public squares, and in synagogues to reach as many people as he could. As he traveled from village to village and city to city, his fame spread, and more and more people began to gather to hear him speak. He drew crowds not just from Galilee but also from Samaria, the southernmost province of Judea, and even from beyond Jordan.

As the crowds grew larger and larger, Jesus began to hold public meetings in wide open spaces that could accommodate the throngs of thousands of people who were eager to hear him speak. He preached on seashores, by riverbanks, in deserts, and on mountains, using these varied settings to illustrate the blessings of the Kingdom and to warn people of the snares of the religious traditions of the time. Through his preaching and teachings, He was making major efforts in order to break the chains of religious traditions and warn people about their errors, and bring them back to the truth.—Matt. 4:12-25; 5:1; 9:35; 14:13-15; 15:32, 33; Mark 4:1; 8:1-4; Luke 8:1; 20:1.

This passage is referencing the teachings and actions of the religious leaders of Jesus’ time as described in the Gospel of Matthew in the New Testament. It describes how Jesus criticized these leaders for their hypocrisy, emphasizing that they were not truly following God’s word but rather were concerned with their own power and status. The passage also references Jesus’ warning of a coming judgment and the destruction of the temple in Jerusalem. The passage attempts to convey that Jesus did not mince words when it came to the importance of true faith and the danger of religious hypocrisy. Jesus warned people about false religious leaders. He said these leaders were not being honest and were leading people in the wrong direction. They were focused on impressing others and did not truly follow God’s teachings. Jesus called them liars and said they were like snakes. He also warned that something bad would happen to them and their holy place. He also asked how these false leaders can avoid going to Gehenna.—Matt. 15:1-14; 23:1-38; 24:1, 2; John 8:44.

Gehenna: (γέεννα geenna) occurs twelve times and is the Greek name for the Valley of Hinnom, southwest of Jerusalem (Jer. 7:31), where the horrendous worship of Moloch took place, and it was prophetically said that this was where dead bodies would be thrown. (Jer. 7:32; 19:6) It was an incinerator where trash and dead bodies were destroyed, not a place to be burned alive or tormented. Jesus and his disciples used Gehenna to symbolize eternal destruction, annihilation, or the “second death,” an eternal punishment of death.

In describing the reaction of religious leaders known as scribes and Pharisees to the teachings of Jesus Christ and his followers, we see that they found Jesus’ warning and teachings to be so powerful that many people were drawn to him. They were unable to stop his influence. The passage also mentions that after Jesus’ death, his followers continued to spread his message and used similar methods as Jesus, with similar success. They preached in public and in homes, and as a result, their numbers grew. This caused the scribes and Pharisees to become angry, and the passage states that the followers of Jesus “turned the world upside down,” meaning that they disrupted the status quo of the religious practices of the time. This upset the scribes and Pharisees as they have built their religious business on the false foundation of tradition and ceremony.

We get the actions of the religious leaders and their attempts to stop Jesus and his followers from spreading their message. They were unable to stop the spread of the message despite their efforts, and as a result, their nation and place were not saved. There are many examples from the Bible, such as the flood and the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah, to illustrate that people cannot change the outcome of God’s warnings unless they repent and turn from their ways. These leaders will not escape the consequences of their actions, and that their place and the nation will be destroyed, and they will face judgment and eternal destruction. It emphasizes the power and inevitability of God’s warning and that attempting to stop or nullify them will not be successful in the end.—Matt. 23:33.

IN SUMMARY

In the Bible, Jesus is depicted as using direct and strong language when giving warnings to false religious leaders and others who were not following God’s teachings. He used phrases such as “liars and fools, serpents and vipers, and sons of Satan” to describe them. He also used stark imagery and predictions of destruction for those who do not follow God’s word. He used this type of direct and blunt language to emphasize the gravity and urgency of his message and to clearly convey the consequences of not following God’s teachings. He also wanted to expose the deceitfulness of the false leaders who were leading people astray. This type of direct speech help to distinguish the true teachings of God from false teaching as a matter of life and death.

The reaction of the Pharisees, Scribes, and Sadducees to Jesus’ and his disciples’ preaching was generally one of opposition. They saw Jesus and his teachings as a threat to their own power and influence, and they sought to discredit him and his followers.

The Pharisees were the religious elite of their time, and they were the guardians of Jewish tradition. They were offended by Jesus’ teachings which went against their traditions, and they saw Jesus as a heretic. They also were concerned that Jesus’ teachings would lose their religious hold and influence over the people. They often criticized Jesus and sought to trap him in arguments and debates.

The Scribes were experts in Jewish Law and also considered themselves part of the religious elite. They, like the Pharisees, were offended by Jesus’ teachings, which went against their understanding of the law. They, too, joined with the Pharisees in criticizing Jesus and looking for ways to trap him in debates.

The Sadducees were a small, wealthy, and powerful group of priests and aristocrats. They rejected the belief in the afterlife and resurrection, which was a central part of Jesus’ teachings. They also rejected many other beliefs held by the Pharisees, and they opposed Jesus as they saw him as a rival and threat to their religious and political power.

Overall, the Pharisees, Scribes, and Sadducees saw Jesus and his teachings as a threat to their own power and influence. They criticized Jesus, sought to discredit him and his followers, and eventually joined in a concerted effort to have Jesus executed.

The reaction to Jesus’ and his disciples’ preaching varied depending on the audience and context. Generally, there were many people who were drawn to Jesus’ message and were convinced by his teachings. They became his followers and helped to spread his message. However, there were also many who were opposed to Jesus’ message and actively sought to stop him and his followers from spreading it. This included religious leaders such as scribes and Pharisees, who saw Jesus’ teachings as a threat to their own power and influence. They criticized Jesus and his followers and sought to discredit them. Eventually, they orchestrated Jesus’ crucifixion.

Furthermore, there were different reactions depending on the type of audience. Many religious leaders rejected Jesus’ teachings because they felt they challenged the status quo of their religious practices. However, many among common people were attracted to Jesus’ message as it was simple, direct and easily understandable. Jesus’ message also emphasized on love, compassion, and justice, which resonate with most people. It is also recorded in the bible that many healings and miracles were performed by Jesus, which helped to convince many people of his teachings.

In the Bible, it is stated that the unheeding warned ones did not escape the consequences of their actions. They ignored the warnings of Jesus and his followers, and as a result, they faced judgment and punishment.

For example, according to the New Testament, the religious leaders of the time, including the Pharisees, Scribes, and Sadducees, ignored Jesus’ warnings about their false teachings and hypocritical practices. They sought to silence Jesus and his followers and plotted his crucifixion. However, despite their efforts, Jesus’ message spread, and many people believed in his teachings. The religious leaders also eventually saw the fall of their place, and nation, and the destruction of their city and Temple, as warned by Jesus.

It is also written in the New Testament that Jesus warned about the coming destruction of Jerusalem by Roman army, which would be a judgment of God for the unrepentance of the people. and that anyone who would not listen to his message and heed the warning would not escape.

In summary, the reason why the unheeding warned ones did not escape is that they ignored the warnings of Jesus and his followers and refused to change their ways or repent. As a result, they faced the consequences of their actions and the judgment of God.

REASONING WITH OTHER RELIGIONS

The Bible teaches that this present world is under the control of Satan, who is often referred to as the ruler of this world or the prince of this age. The Bible also teaches that this world is in a state of rebellion against God and is characterized by evil, suffering, and sin. However, it also teaches that God has a plan for salvation for repentant humanity through Jesus Christ, who came to conquer sin and death.

The Bible says that Jesus’ death and resurrection have made it possible for all people who accept Christ to have a personal relationship with God and to have eternal life. The Bible teaches that at the end of this present age, Jesus will return and establish God’s kingdom and rule over the earth for a thousand years. This is sometimes referred to as the “end times” or the “end of the age” and is believed to be characterized by God’s judgment and the ultimate defeat of Satan and evil.

Thus, as per Bible, in the present world, Christians are called to follow Jesus’ teachings and proclaim his message of salvation to others while they look forward to the end of the present evil world of wicked mankind and the coming of the kingdom of God. Furthermore, they believe that the present evil world of mankind is temporary and that the ultimate triumph of good over evil will occur at the end of this age.

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