THE MAKING OF BIBLE MANUSCRIPTS

The Holy Scriptures have both a divine origin for their content and a human history for their creation and preservation. The book of the Bible was not originally one unified book, but rather a collection of various books written over time.

TEXTUAL STUDIES: Manuscripts of the Bible

Unlock the secrets of the Bible's past with this article. Dive deep into the historical analysis of the Bible's manuscripts to gain a new understanding of the accuracy and authenticity of the texts we hold sacred today. From the Dead Sea Scrolls to the Codex Vaticanus, this article will challenge your perceptions and deepen your knowledge of the Bible's transmission, corruption, and restoration through time.

Transmitting the Hebrew Scriptures to You

The Hebrew Scriptures, also known as the Old Testament, is a section of the Holy Bible that is written primarily in Hebrew, with a few chapters and isolated verses written in Aramaic. This collection of texts was completed over 2,400 years ago, and many people question the accuracy of modern copies in comparison to the original texts.

HOW WE GOT THE HEBREW OLD TESTAMENT: From the Days of Ezra to the Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia

The Hebrew Old Testament, also known as the Tanakh or Hebrew Bible, is the collection of thirty-nine sacred texts that are central to Judaism and are also accepted by many Christian denominations as part of their canon of scripture. The Hebrew Old Testament includes the Torah (also known as the Pentateuch or the Five Books of Moses), the Prophets, and the Writings. It is the authoritative text of the Old Testament by Jews and many Christian scholars.

Scribes of the Bible

Reference in early OT times to those employed for their ability to transcribe information. After the exile, scribes are a class of scholars who teach, copy, and interpret the Jewish Law for the people. They appear in the Gospels primarily as opponents of Jesus.

Who Were the Bible Scribes?

Although scribes continue to perform such roles in the postexilic period (cf. Neh. 13:13, where a scribe named Zadok is appointed as a treasurer over the storehouses where tithes are kept), the term begins to be more specifically associated with the transmission and interpretation of Torah.

Professional Scribes and Secretaries

Scribes were employed as secretaries in Palestine, Egypt, Mesopotamia, and the Greco-Roman Empire. Court scribes would sometimes rise to positions of social prestige and considerable political influence, much as a Secretary of State today.

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