Finding an Interpretive Approach to the Revelation of John

The Book of Revelation was written around A.D. 95 in Asia Minor by the apostle John, who, was on the island of Patmos, not far from the coast of Asia Minor. Revelation is one of the most fascinating books of the Bible. However, much debate surrounds the proper interpretation of this work. Is it a prophecy of future events yet to take place, or have the prophecies of this book been fulfilled?

You Took that Bible Verse Out of Context

In discussions concerning interpretations of the Bible, we often hear the phrase, “you took that out of context.” In fact, we often hear that in discussions outside the Bible, as when the media quotes a politician and the politician feels he or she has been unfairly treated. In its popular usage, the phrase seems simply to mean, “You got that wrong.”

THE PASTOR IN HIS SERMON: “The English Says, …”

How many times have we been in church listening to the preacher do a good job expositing (explaining) the text?  At some point, he says “Now, what the Greek actually says is…” At that pronouncement, the congregation grows a little quieter and a little more attentive.  Why is that?

MATTHEW 5:11 For Christ’s Sake

As Christians, let us be Christians, recognizably followers of Christ, doing His will in all we do and trying our duty at every stage simply by these questions: Is it according to His will? Does it serve His glory? Is it for His sake? So doing, we cannot but approve ourselves before man and God as followers of Him.

THE SECRET OF THE AGES Ephesians 3:1-19

A mystery, in this biblical sense, is not to be understood in the same sense of mystery in modern usage. It does not mean that the truth Paul is proclaiming is mysterious or puzzling. Rather, mystery is a technical term, meaning “something that has not previously been made known.” - Max Anders

THE THEOLOGY OF PAUL: Stand Firm

The Christians in Thessalonica were urged to adhere to what they had been taught. This passage can furnish no authority for holding the teachings which have come down from church leaders. No one should ever refer to themselves as a Calvinist, an Arminian, a Lutheran, a Wesleyan, and so on. You're either a Christian or you are not.

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