The Epistle of Paul to the Hebrews

The Epistle to the Hebrews, or Letter to the Hebrews, or in the Greek manuscripts, simply To the Hebrews (Πρὸς Ἑβραίους) is one of the books of the New Testament. The text does not mention the name of its author, but was written by the apostle Paul about 61 C.E. in Rome.

The Epistle of Paul to Philemon

Paul the Apostle to Philemon, abbreviation Philemon, brief New Testament letter written by St. Paul the Apostle to a wealthy Christian of Colossae, in the ancient Roman province of Asia (now in western Turkey), on behalf of Onesimus, who was enslaved to Philemon and may have run away from him. It was written about 60–61 C.E. in Rome.

The Epistle of Paul to Titus

The Epistle of Paul to Titus, usually referred to simply as Titus, is one of the three pastoral epistles (along with 1 Timothy and 2 Timothy) in the New Testament, written by the apostle Paul about 61–64 C.E. in possibly Macedonia. It is addressed to Titus and describes the requirements and duties of elders and overseers.

The Second Epistle of Paul to Timothy

In the New Testament, the Second Epistle of Paul to Timothy, usually referred to simply as Second Timothy and often written 2 Timothy or II Timothy, is one of the three pastoral epistles traditionally attributed to Paul the Apostle, along with First Timothy and Titus. It was written by the apostle Paul 65 C.E. in Rome.

The First Epistle of Paul to Timothy

The First Epistle of Paul to Timothy, usually referred to simply as First Timothy and often written 1 Timothy, is one of three letters in the New Testament of the Bible often grouped together as the Pastoral Epistles, along with Second Timothy and Titus. It was written by the apostle Paul 61–64 C.E. in Macedonia.

The Second Epistle of Paul to the Thessalonians

Letters of Paul to the Thessalonians, also called Epistles of St. Paul the Apostle to the Thessalonians, abbreviation Thessalonians, two New Testament letters written by St. Paul the Apostle from Corinth, Achaea (now in southern Greece), about 50 C.E. and addressed to the Christian community he had founded in Thessalonica (now in northern Greece). The First Letter of Paul to the Thessalonians and the Second Letter of Paul to the Thessalonians are the 13th and 14th books of the New Testament canon. Paul had left Thessalonica abruptly (see Ac 17:5-10) after a rather brief stay. Recent converts from paganism (1:9) were thus left with little external support in the midst of persecution. Paul's purpose in writing this letter was to encourage the new converts in their trials (3:3-5), to give instruction concerning godly living (4:1-12) and to give assurance concerning the future of believers who die before Christ returns (4:13-18).

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