What Does the Bible Say About God As a Spirit?

God is A spirit – This is the second reason why men should worship him in spirit and in truth. By this is meant that God is without a body but He has spirit body; yet he is not material or composed of parts; that he is invisible, in every place, pure and holy. This is one of the first truths of religion, and one of the sublimest ever presented to the mind of man. Almost all nations have had some idea of God as gross or material, but the Bible declares that he is a pure spirit. As he is such a spirit, he dwells not in temples made with hands Act_7:48, neither is worshipped with men’s hands as though he needed anything, seeing he giveth to all life, and breath, and all things, Act_17:25. A pure, a holy, a spiritual worship, therefore, is such as he seeks – the offering of the soul rather than the formal offering of the body – the homage of the heart rather than that of the lips.

What Makes a New Testament Manuscript Trustworthy, Accurate, and Weighty?

What is it that makes P66 P75 א B ‘quality external evidence’ or very weighty evidence over A* Θ Ψ 050 f1, Maj? Maj refers minuscules The Majority Text; that is, a group that is made up of thousands of minuscules that display a similar text. So, here we see that counting the manuscripts (the majority wins) does not mean that the majority is evidence for the preferred reading being original.

Textual Character and the Scribe of P75 (Papyrus 75)

P75 contains most of Luke and John, known as Bodmer 14, 15 (P75), dates from 175 C.E. to 225 C.E. It is textually very close to Codex Vaticanus. A handful from the 19th and early 20th centuries argued that Codex Vaticanus and Sinaiticus manuscripts removed the Byzantine text readings. However, if this were true and the corrupt Byzantine readings were early as some claim, we would have those readings in P75 to prove it, as well as the other 60+ papyrus manuscripts dating from 100-300 A.D.

DAILY DEVOTIONAL SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 09, 2020

For I bear them witness that they have a zeal for God, but not according to accurate knowledge.—Rom. 10:2.

“They did not lack zeal; they lacked knowledge (not “head” knowledge, gnosis, but “real” knowledge, perception, or recognition, epignosis). As a result of their lack of knowledge, their zeal became misguided. Interestingly, zeal (zelos) is most often translated “jealousy” in Paul’s epistles, context making the difference. But in its essence, zeal is jealousy, and it can be in a healthy sense. Paul is saying that because the Jews lacked spiritual perception, their jealousy was for their religious traditions rather than the things of God. And Paul should know, as that is what he was zealous/jealous for (Acts 22:3; 21:20; Gal. 1:13–14; Phil. 3:6).” Kenneth Boa and William Kruidenier