Psalm 119.147

Evening and Morning Twilight

Psalm 119:147-149 Updated American Standard Version (UASV)

147 I rise before dawn and cry for help;
I hope in your words.
148 My eyes anticipate the night watches,
that I may meditate on your word.
149 Hear my voice according to your loyal love;
O Jehovah, according to your justice give me life.

how-to-study-your-bible1As we enter into the end of a day, between sunset and when the actual darkness sets in, there is a short period of evening twilight when the stars can be seen. This time was called nesheph by the ancient Hebrews and clearly is the time meant by the expression “between the two evenings,” as found at Exodus 12:6. (Prov. 7:9) Likewise, as we close out the night’s darkness there is a morning twilight, which leads to the dawn and this too was expressed by the same Hebrew word. Thus, the writer of Psalm 119:147 says: “I rise before dawn and cry for help.”

The Psalmist is steadfast and unwavering in his dedication to trust and obey the inspired, fully inerrant, authoritative Word of God. He rises before dawn and cries for help, wherein he places his hope in the God’s words. Throughout the night watches,[1] he does the same, meditating upon God’s promises. As the Psalmist come to God in prayer day and night, he pleads for God’s love and asks that God protect his life to the extent that he has trusted in God’s law, i.e., completely.

Prayers with the whole heart are offered only by those who desire God’s salvation, and who love his inspired, fully inerrant, authoritative Word. We petition the Father to save us from our sins, our corruptions, and our temptations, all the obstruction to our walking righteously with God, as we endeavor to keep his commandments. If we have a solid hope in God’s Word, we will continue steadfast in our prayer life, be it day or night. Which is better, to take some time from our sleep, or to look for a convenient time to pray. We have access to God every hour of the day and he should be in our thoughts and prayers through the entire day, and especially first thing in the morning, as this will help to keep us right in his eyes all day long.

[1] It appears that each watch (evening, midnight, and morning) covered one-third of the time between sundown and sunrise, or about four hours each, depending on the time of the year. The first watch would run from about 6:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. The second night watch would begin about 10:00 p.m. and run until about 2:00 a.m., while the third night watch would run from about 2:00 a.m. to 6:00 a.m.

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