Bible Translation Is a Hazardous Duty

Bible translation goes back to 280 to 150 B.C.E., when (seventy-two, according to tradition) translators gave us the Hebrew Old Testament books in Greek. From those days forward, translators have lived very dangerous lives, in trying to bring us the Word of God in the common languages of man. Most times this has been from... Continue Reading →

William Tyndale’s Plowboy Reconsidered

This essay is a historical study.  That may seem anomalous in a journal devoted to current translation issues and practices, so a word of explanation is in order.  One of the functions of inquiring into the history of English Bible translation is that it can clarify the essential principles of Bible translation.  When the issues... Continue Reading →

Jerome: The Forerunner in Bible Translation

The Catholic Church Sacred Tradition in support of the Vulgate's magisterial authority: Moreover, this sacred and holy Synod,—considering that no small utility may accrue to the Church of God, if it be made known which out of all the Latin editions, now in circulation, of the sacred books, is to be held as authentic,—ordains and... Continue Reading →

The Bible Translation Debate

UNTIL THE MIDDLE OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY, all major English Bible translations were based on the premise that the goal of Bible translation is to take the reader as close as possible to the words that the biblical authors actually wrote.

Powered by WordPress.com.

Up ↑